Slaves of Righteousness

24 Jun

Slaves of Righteousness. ( See the complete Article here)

Quote from the Article:

“Put simply, “Justification frees us from the guilt of sin, sanctification from the pollution of sin.” [5]

Dying to our sin is then the first step in the process of sanctification. It’s the process through which the Spirit refines us, killing off the remnants of our former selves—our sinful habits, tastes, and desires—and replacing them with godly affections and inclinations. It’s the active, ongoing transformation of your heart, mind, and entire self, beginning at the moment of salvation and continuing throughout the remainder of your life.
When we are born again [regeneration], God not only declares us righteous [justification], but He also begins to cultivate righteousness in our lives [sanctification]. Thus salvation is not only a forensic declaration; it is a miracle of conversion, of transformation. There is no such thing as a true convert to Christ who is justified but who is not being sanctified. . . . As the sinful, unregenerate person cannot help manifesting his or her true character, neither can the regenerate person. [6]

 

As slaves of righteousness, it is impossible to remain slaves of sin. Our new nature in Christ guarantees a transformed life. Paul emphasizes the change that ought to be manifest in every believer in Romans 6:3-5.”
As John explains,
In Christ we are not the same people we were before salvation. “Our old self was crucified with Him, that our body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves to sin” (Romans 6:6). . . . Our new life as Christians is not an amended old life but a divinely bestowed new life that is of the same nature as Christ’s very own. . . .

 

That does not mean our sinful tendencies are annihilated. The Greek word translated “done away with” literally means “to render inoperative, invalidate.” Sin has lost its dominating control over us. Obviously we all struggle with sinful propensities. Death to the sinful self does not mean death to the flesh and its corrupted inclinations. Because of the pleasures of sin and the weakness of our remaining flesh, we often yield to sin.

 

The tyranny and penalty of sin have been nullified, but sin’s potential for expression has not yet been fully removed. Our human weaknesses and instincts make us capable of succumbing to temptation. . . . We are, in short, new creations—holy and redeemed but wrapped in grave clothes of unredeemed flesh. We are like Lazarus, who came forth from the grave still wrapped from head to foot in his burial garments. [7]

 

As slaves of righteousness, our entire being has been rescued and reoriented under the authority of Christ. Through the work of the Spirit, we are being conformed into Christ’s character and refined for the work of His kingdom.
See the full article here: http://www.gty.org/blog/B15062

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